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El Salvador - Civil Ensign and Alternative State Flag

Last modified: 2021-08-25 by rob raeside
Keywords: el salvador |
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(3:5)
image by Željko Heimer, 7 January 2003



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Description and use of the flag

The governmental flag is ure blue over white over blue flag, with yellow text DIOS UNION LIBERTAD (God, Union, Liberty), ratio 3:5. The motto on the flag is taken from the coat of arms, the yellow band under the triangle.According to W.Smith [smi75a], the govermental flag is used by the goverment on land and sea, by civilians on sea and by the army on land.
Željko Heimer, 29 Febuary 1996

From El Salvador Embassy in USA site:
"The Nation's Flag consists of two horizontal blue stripes with a white stripe in the middle of them on a cloth parallelogram the officially measures 3.35 meters long by 1.89 meters wide. The stripes are 0.63 meters wide.
Adopted through a Legislative Decree of May 17, 1912 it is the same Central American Federation flag decreed by the Constituting National Assembly on August 21, 1823. It was sworn at Campo Marte Park on September 15th of the same year 1912 when it was personally raised by the President of the Republic, Dr. Manuel Enrique Araujo."
Dov Gutterman, 21 January 2002

According to Album 2000 [pay00]:
Civil Ensign and alternative State Flag (-CW/CS- 3:5) - Blue-white-blue triband with yellow inscription DIOS UNION LIBERTAD along the white stripe. The yellow (gold) inscription is relatively new practice (in the case of Salvador that means post-WWII). Previously variations with silver inscriptions were used . I did not follow the issue further, was it that at some pioint the gold vs. silver inscription designated the level of the bearer (kind of). Is silver inscription alltogether abandoned today?
I would suspect that this flags would be used only is the inscription is readable properly on both sides, and that if this can't be ensured (e.g. cause of the price), one always have possibility of using some of the other two versions. Then again, the civil and state ensign has no variation and require the inscription...
Željko Heimer, 7 January 2003

Here is a picture of the flag, which I saw flying at the Air Force headquarters, also at three different military institutions and the military academy. As I was told the proportions of this flag are 1:3. It is a very long flag.
Fred Drews, 7 October 2004

Dipping into some saved “edwinart” offers (eBay Store: Edwin’s Stuff) I came across offer no. 200355655497 (end 29 Jun 2009) seen in much reduced photo.
Approximate dimensions given as 11.5" x 17" and said to date – roughly – “from late 50s to early 70s”.
Rather worn, this flag has “screenprinted stripes and [blue, jm] wording. Its slightly unusual in that it has the "Y" added before the word "LIBERTAD.”
TWM disclaimer: “This and other flags I have were part of the Tumbling Waters flag museum in Montgomery AL that went defunct in early 80s and sold out to the Historical Society. These flags are the "culls" from the collection.”
As above item is screen printed, it may have been a cheap and unofficial version.
Jan Mertens, 27 August 2009

See also: Merchant Ensign