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Personal Flag of H.M. King Maha Vajiralongkorn (Thailand)

Last modified: 2019-05-28 by zachary harden
Keywords: king maha vajiralongkorn | maha vajiralongkorn |
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[Personal Flag of H.R.H. King Maha Vajiralongkorn (Thailand)] image by Phanuwit Woonchoom and Zachary Harden, 18 August 2018



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Description

A yellow flag with his cypher in the center. The cypher reads his initials (ว.ป.ร.: มหาวชิราลงกรณ์ ปรมราชาธิราช : Mahavajiralongkorn Paramarajadhiraja (Vajiralongkorn Rex); this symbol is topped by the Great Crown of Victory. Between the crown and symbol, an unalome can be seen.

The symbolism of the emblem, designed by Mr. Sunthon Wilai (นายสุนทร วิไล) on 5 November 2016, was detailed as follows from a press release to the Thai media on 29 November 2016:

The number "10" represents that he is the tenth king of the Chakri Dynasty.
The cypher reads his regal name "Maha Vajiralongkorn Bodindradebayavarangkun"
The colors of the cypher is as follows;
1. Cream white for his birth (on Monday)
2. Golden-yellow for his father, H.M. King Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX; was also born on a Monday)
3. Blue for his mother, H.M. Queen Sirikit (born on a Friday)

Zachary Harden, 18 August 2018


Coronation Ceremony (2019)

[Flag of the 2019 Coronation Ceremony (2019) (Thailand)] image by Phanuwit Woonchoom, 12 March 2019

On March 11th, 2019, the Office of the Prime Minister announced the symbol of the coronation ceremony for King Rama X. This symbol, as announced by the government, was also placed on a yellow flag and will be on display at the OPM. The public is also allowed to own and use such a flag during the ceremonies in early May 2019. The official description of the emblem from the Thai Government is as follows;

The Royal Emblem on the Auspicious Occasion of the Coronation of King Rama X B.E. 2562 (2019) The Royal Emblem, marking the Coronation of King Rama X B.E. 2562 (2019), depicts, in the centre, in white trimmed with gold, the Royal Cypher of His Majesty King Maha Vajiralongkorn. Each letter of the Cypher is decorated with diamonds which denote the origin from which the royal name "Maha Vajiralongkorn" is derived, whilst the gold trimming of the Cypher represents the colour of Monday which is the day of birth of His Majesty. The Cypher rests on a background of dark blue, the colour of righteous kingship, contained within a lotus bud frame marked out in gold and green, the mixture of which two colours signifies the power and might of His Majesty's day of birth. The lotus bud frame begets inspiration from the shape of its foremost predecessor -- the frame which enclosed the Great Unalome insignia of the Royal Seal of State of His Majesty King Buddha Yodfa Chulalok the Great (Rama I), founder of the Chakri Dynasty. Surrounding the outer parts of the frame are the Five Royal Regalia, deemed to embody the symbol of Kingship itself. Placed on top of the Royal Cypher is the Great Crown of Victory with the Unalome insignia which Unalome includes within it the sequence number of this reign. The Sword of Victory and the Royal Whisk of the Yak's Tail lie to the right of the Emblem while on the left of the Royal Emblem are placed the Royal Sceptre and the Royal Fan, and, lastly, below the Royal Cypher rest the Royal Slippers. The Great Crown of Victory represents the great burden bearing down on the person of His Majesty for the sake of his people's happiness. The Sword of Victory symbolises His Majesty's responsibility to protect the Kingdom from all harm threatening it. The Royal Sceptre signifies His Majesty's Royal virtues to bring forth peace and stability to the Kingdom. The Royal Whisk and the Royal Fan symbolise His Majesty's righteousness as a ruler in relieving the suffering and hardship of His subjects. The Royal Slippers represent His Majesty's care in fostering the sustenance and welfare throughout the Kingdom. Standing tall behind the Great Crown of Victory is the Great Umbrella of State trimmed with bands of gold. At the top of the Umbrella of State is the lotus bud finial showing Brahma Faces while the lowest tier of the Umbrella is decorated with golden Champa bouquets representing the extension in all directions yonder of His writ and authority. On the lowest part of the Emblem run stretches of green-gold ribbon, trimmed in gold, bearing the words "The Coronation of King Rama X B.E. 2562 (2019)". At the right tip of the ribbon stands the purple Kojasi holding up a Seven-tiered Umbrella representing the Armed Forces. On the left tip of the ribbon stands the white Ratchasi holding a second Seven-tiered Umbrella which represents the Civil Service, which left and right together form the two pillars of public service. On the inner side of the shafts of the two Umbrellas, there are golden Naga traceries denoting the year of the dragon, the year of His Majesty's birth. The golden colour of the Naga traceries signifies the prosperity for the nation and her people.
Zachary Harden, 12 March 2019

[Ed: The designer of the emblem is not certain as of this time; what is known is that a committee of several artists of the Fine Arts Department were consulted before the final design was chosen by King Vajiralongkorn. There was also a slight modification to the design by the Fine Arts Department after the King approved it, mostly to fix color issues and the line pattern on the parasols from two lines to three (see below).]

[Flag of the 2019 Coronation Ceremony (2019) (Thailand)] image by Pasit Piboonnamchai, 11 March 2019


As Crown Prince

[Personal Flag of H.R.H. Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn (Thailand)] image by Zachary Harden, 20 November 2016

The personal flag of H.R.H Crown Maha Vajiralongkorn, born July 28 1952, has his royal cypher centered on a yellow/golden field, as he was born on a Monday, like his father. He also has the Great Crown of Victory on top of the cypher, yet it does not include the sun rays like his father's and mother's flags. Between the cypher and the Great Crown is the emblem of the Chakri dynasty, a discus and a trident combined together). Like the personal flags of the former King and the Queen Dowager, these flags can be purchased and used by the public to honor the Crown Prince on his birthday or during visits in Thailand.
Zachary Harden, 20 November 2016

Sixtieth Birthday (2012)

[Personal Flag of H.R.H. Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn (Thailand)] image by Zachary Harden, 18 August 2018

The emblem was designed by Sumet Putpuang (สุเมธ พุฒพวง) (Source). The symbolism can be read here (Thai).
Zachary Harden, 18 August 2018

Farm Clinic

[Personal Flag of H.R.H. Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn (Thailand)] image by Zachary Harden, 19 August 2018; emblem from the Thai Government

One of the projects supported by then Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn was to set up mobile farm clinics and other support systems for remote parts of the country, officially called "โครงการคลินิกเกษตรเคลื่อนที่ในพระราชานุเคราะห์ สมเด็จพระบรมโอรสาธิราชฯ สยามมกุฎราชกุมาร" (Mobile Agriculture Clinic Under The Patronage Of His Majesty The Crown Prince), was ran as a partnership between the Crown Prince and the Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives. This cooperation is noticed with the use of the Ministry's emblem on a white cross, charged with a wheat ear. This section is placed on a green background; this symbol is topped with the emblem of the Crown Prince and the text "โครงการคลินิกเกษตรเคลื่อนที่" appears below in a scroll. This is all put in a white oval surrounded by a dark gold ring. As for a flag, this 2016 ceremony shows this entire emblem is placed on a white flag. Events where this initiative is a sponsor would see this flag paired with the national flag.
Zachary Harden, 19 August 2018

Pre-1998 flags

[Personal Flag of H.R.H. King Maha Vajiralongkorn (Thailand)] image by Phanuwit Woonchoom, 18 August 2018

This flag was seen in a 1994 YouTube video.
Phanuwit Woonchoom, 18 August 2018

[Personal Flag of H.R.H. King Maha Vajiralongkorn (Thailand)] image by Phanuwit Woonchoom, 18 August 2018

[Personal Flag of H.R.H. King Maha Vajiralongkorn (Thailand)] image by Phanuwit Woonchoom, 18 August 2018


Spouses and children

Vajiralongkorn was married four times and was last married days before his 2019 coronation. The spouses are in order of marriage: Soamsawali Kitiyakara (m. 1977; div. 1991), Yuvadhida Polpraserth (m. 1994; div. 1996), Srirasmi Suwadee (m. 2001; div. 2014) Suthida Tidjai (m. 2019). [As of 9 May 2019] Out of the four spouses, only Soamsawali and Srirasmi had flags and it was modeled off of the other royal flags (monogram on a single colored background). [Ed. note: The spouse is listed as HTML header three and the children produced are listed below in HTML header four.]

Soamsawali

[Personal Flag of H.R.H. King Maha Vajiralongkorn (Thailand)] Soamsawali flag; image by Phanuwit Woonchoom, 9 May 2019

The flag of Princess Soamsawali is purple to signify the day of her birth and uses her personal monogram in the center.

Bajrakitiyabha

[Personal Flag of H.R.H. King Maha Vajiralongkorn (Thailand)] Bajrakitiyabha flag; image by Phanuwit Woonchoom, 9 May 2019

Bajrakitiyabha, eldest daughter of Soamsawali, uses an orange flag with her monogram in the center.

Yuvadhida Polpraserth

Sirivannavari

[Personal Flag of H.R.H. King Maha Vajiralongkorn (Thailand)] Sirivannavari flag; image by Phanuwit Woonchoom, 9 May 2019

As princess/consort, Yuvadhida Polpraserth did not take on a personal flag or symbol. However, the only child between her and Vajiralongkorn, Sirivannavari, has taken on a flag which is orange with her monogram in the center.

Srirasmi

[Personal Flag of H.R.H. King Maha Vajiralongkorn (Thailand)] Srirasmi flag; image by Phanuwit Woonchoom, 9 May 2019

Srirasmi used an orange flag with her monogram in the center.

Dipangkorn

[Personal Flag of H.R.H. King Maha Vajiralongkorn (Thailand)] Dipangkorn flag; image by Phanuwit Woonchoom, 9 May 2019

Prince Dipangkorn uses a blue flag with his personal monogram in the center.

Suthida

[Personal Flag of H.R.H. King Maha Vajiralongkorn (Thailand)] Suthida flag; image by Zachary Harden, 29 May 2019

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