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Quintana Roo (Mexico)

Estado Libre y Soberano de Quintana Roo

Last modified: 2020-02-22 by juan manuel gabino villascán
Keywords: mexico | quintana roo | coat of arms | armorial flag | flag (armorial) | sun | sea | forest |
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[Quintana Roo] 4:7 [Civil and State flag]
1 | 2 | 3 | 4
Flag first adopted: 6 September 2013, by Decree 315 establishing the Ley de la Bandera del Estado de Quintana Roo published the same date.
Flag modified: 1 January 2016, by Decree 377 published on 30 December 2015.
by Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 2 March 2014


See also:

Presentation of Quintana Roo

  • Official name (Spanish): Estado Libre y Soberano de Quintana Roo
  • Official name (English): Free and Sovereign State of Quintana Roo
  • Short-form names: State of Quintana Roo; Quintana Roo
  • Location: The less-populated Mexican State lies on the Yucatan Peninsula, SW of Mexico. Quintana Roo comprises the beautiful islands of Cozumel and Mujeres in the Caribbean Sea, world-famous tourist resorts like Cancún, Chetumal, Punta Allen, and interesting archeological places such as Tulum, Cobá, Xcaret, El Rey, Muyil, San Gervasio, Xel-Ha. It neighbors the Mexican States of Yucatan (NE), and Campeche (SE). Both, the Gulf of Mexico (N) and the Caribbean Sea bathe the Quintana Roo coast. To the South the State limits Belize.
  • Area: 34 205 km2
  • Population: 1 501 562 inhabitants (2015)
  • Capital: Chetumal, municipality of Othón P. Blanco (Pop.: 151 243 [2010])
  • Statehood: 8 October 1974
  • Arms adopted: 31 March 1978, revised on 1 January 1994, 2008, February 2011 and 1 January 2016
  • Flag first adopted: 6 September 2013, by Decree 315 establishing the Ley de la Bandera del Estado de Quintana Roo published the same date. Revised on 1 January 2016, by Decree 377 published on 30 December 2015.
  • Municipalities: 11 (in italics the municipal seat)
    • 001 Cozumel Cozumel
      002 Felipe Carrillo Puerto Felipe Carrillo Puerto
      003 Isla Mujeres Isla Mujeres
      004 Othón P. Blanco Chetumal
      005 Benito Juárez Cancún
      006 José María Morelos José María Morelos
      007 Lázaro Cárdenas Kantunilkín
      008 Solidaridad Playa del Carmen
      009 Tulum Tulum
      010 Bacalar Bacalar
      011 Puerto Morelos Puerto Morelos

Reported by Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán 4 January 2020


Flag

    2016 to present

[Quintana Roo] 4:7 [Civil and State flag]
1 | 2 | 3 | 4
Flag adopted: 1 January 2016, by Decree 377 published on 30 December 2015.
by Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 2 March 2014

The coat of arms changed on 1 January 2016, adding the eleventh ray to the rinsing-sun atop of the shield representing the newly created municipality of Puerto Morelos; thus, the flag changes.
Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 4 January 2020.


    2013 - 2016

[2013-2016 Quintana Roo] 4:7 [Civil and State flag]
1 | 2 | 3 | 4
Flag adopted: 6 September 2013, by Decree 315 establishing the Ley de la Bandera del Estado de Quintana Roo published the same date.
by Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 4 January 2020.

The flag of the state of Quintana Roo consists in a "white rectangle whose center bears the state's coat of arms which is placed in a area equivalent to one third of the rectangle's width and length. The rectangle is proportioned four to seven". [Ley sobre la bandera del estado de Quintana Roo, art. 3rd]. The flag was adopted on 6 September 2013, but was first raised on 8 October 2013 during the 39th anniversary of statehood [see: Chetumal Se iza por primera vez la Bandera de Quintana Roo / "Se iza por primera vez la bandera de Quintana Roo" / "Izan por primera vez la bandera de Quintana Roo" / "Iza el gobernador Roberto Borge Angulo por vez primera la bandera de Quintana Roo"]. The flag, with the corresponding variations in the coat of arms, had been de-facto used by both federal and state governments since the 1980's.
Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 4 January 2020.


Coat of arms

In 1902 the current territory of Quintana Roo was separated from Yucatan to form the Federal Territory of Quintana Roo. The Sovereign Free State was created on 8 October 1974, being Governor Attorney David G. Gutiérrez Ruiz. Until then, Quinta Roo has distinctive arms. In the Quintana Roo coat of arms are represented the State's main geographical features: warm climate (stylized sun on red), cloudless sky (star on blue field), and thick vegetation. The crest is a rising sun for Quintana Roo is the far-eastern Mexican State, then where the Mexican day begins.
Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 20 January 2002.


    2016 to present

[Coat of arms of Quintana Roo]
by Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 4 January 2020.

Coat of arms adopted on 1 January 2016, adding the eleventh ray to the sun atop of the shield representing the newly created municipality of Puerto Morelos.
Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 4 January 2020.


    2011 - 2016

[2011-16 coat of arms of Quintana Roo]
by Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 4 January 2020.

Coat of arms of Quintana Roo adopted on 26 February 2011, by Decree 426 published on 25 February 2011. The rising sun now has ten rays representing the addition of the Municipality of Bacalar.
Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 4 January 2020.


    2008-2011

[2008-11 coat of arms of Quintana Roo]
by Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 4 January 2020.

On 2 July 2008 was published the Decree number 022 by which the coat of arms of Quintana Roo was modified adding a ninth ray to the rising-sun for the new municipality of Tulum. The Decree was in force on 3 July 2008. On 23 September 2008 it was published the agreement establishing the official draft of the state coat of arms.
Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 4 January 2020.


    1993-2008

Coat of arms of Quintana Roo adopted in 1993
by Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 4 January 2020.

This shield is of modern origin, I have not been able to establish its age, but is seems to be made about 1950-1960. I keep looking.

Upper left: Red is the Mayan color for the East, and Quintana Roo is the easternmost Mexican state. That [something] or is a sea conch, seen by the side and stylized in an indigenous fashion, which is a symbol of the geographical position of Quinta Roo as the only Mexican state facing the Caribbean Sea and its economic dependence on tourism. Upper right: The argent star over blue is Venus, the morning star, again because Quintana Roo is the easternmost Mexican state. Lower: The three [somethings] in sable are three green trees growing over a green piece of forest, for tropical woods are the main historical wealth of the state (timber, tints, rubber, chewing gum, same as neighbouring Campeche state and Belize). The background or has a double meaning, for the forest riches and for yellow is the Mayan color for the South. Upper crest: The sun is rising, for Quintana Roo is the first piece of Mexican territory receiving the morning light. The sun used to have seven rays, for there were seven municipalities in 1974 when Quintana Roo, youngest Mexican state, was created from a scarcely populated federal territory. Now the Quintana Roo government uses an eight-ray sun for there was created a new municipality, Solidaridad (capital: Playa del Carmen), a piece of mainland coastline that belonged to the Cozumel island municipality but was complicated to govern because of the 20 km of sea that separated Playa del Carmen from its municipal authorities. We can expect that the rising sun will have many more rays in the coming years, for Quintana Roo is growing fastly. You may have not heard about Quintana Roo, but surely you have about Cancún, its biggest city.

Gerardo Kloss, August 3, 2000.


On April 15, 2016 I saw this flag (flag on the left in this source) during an audience of the Tribunal Electoral de Quintana Roo (TEQROO) (Electoral Tribunal of Quintana Roo). The article is dated April 6, 2016 and the location is in the town of Chetumal. After looking at the symbols of Chetumal (coat of arms at Wikipedia; Flag at Wikipedia), the flag in the picture is most certainly that of Quintana Roo. It features the coat of arms over a white horizontal flag. For additional information go to Quintana Roo official website
Esteban Rivera, 19 November 2016.


By Decree number 29 published on 15 December 1993 in force on 1 January 1994, the coat of arms of Quintana Roo was revised adding the eighth ray to the sun for the newly created municipality of Solidaridad with headquarters in Playa del Carmen. It is remarkable that in the article 6th. referring to the lines bordering the shield, cantos and quarters, the word sable (i. e. black) was changed to simple (i. e. "simple" [stripe]).
Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 4 January 2020.


    1978-1993

Coat of arms of Quintana Roo adopted in 1978
by Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 6 May 2001.

By Decree number 119 published on 31 March 1978 in force the same publication day established the Ley sobre las características y el uso del Escudo del Estado de Quintana Roo. Article 6th states the coat of arms features: A modern shield rounded in the point. Above a red rising sun with seven golden rays. In the first canton there is a gold stylized seashell on red; on blue a silver five-pointed star. In the point, three green triangles over the Mayan glyph for wind "IK" all on yellow. The shield, cantons and quarters are all bordered with a black line.
The coat of arms was designed by Chetumal Artist Elio Carmichael in 1978.
Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 4 January 2020.


    1936 - 1978 (unofficial coat of arms)

1936-1978 unofficial coat of arms of Quintana Roo
Historia y Geografía de Quintana Roo, retrieved 2 January 2020

This coat of arms was designed by Colombiar Artist Romulo Rozo who, in 1936, modified the former emblem by replacing the rising-sun with a crown of Mayan freckles.
Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 4 January 2020.


    1927 - 1936 (unofficial coat of arms)

1927 - 1936 unofficial coat of arms of Quintana Roo
by Historia y Geografía de Quintana Roo, retrieved 2 January 2020

Although Diego Rivera and his assistants created a coat of arms for Quintana Roo in 1923, the first coat of arms of Quintana Roo is said that was adopted in 1927, when Italian Artist Gaetano Maglione carved the 1923 coat of arms on the Clock Tower, then located on the De los Heroes Avenue in Payo Obispo (now Chetumal). Gaetano Maglione used the coat of arms painted at the former building of the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City reviewing the three pines in the point of the shield.
From Historia y Geografía de Quintana Roo, retrieved 2 January 2020
Reported by Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 4 January 2020.


    1923 : The coat of arms at the former building of the Secretariat of Public Education

In 1923, Minister of Education José Vasconcelos entrusted Diego Rivera with the representation of the coat of arms of the 28 states, two territories and the Federal District that made up the country, according to the political division of the time. Because not all entities exercised the right to adopt a heraldic emblem, Vasconcelos and Rivera created and designed the 12 shields missing, out of which five states adopted it as an official emblem and the remaining seven modified it. The artist organized the lay out of the emblems while the execution was in charge of his assistants as follows: he placed on the north wall an inscription indicating the reason why these shields were painted and the year of completion. The text reads: Por acuerdo del secretario de educación pública decoran estos muros los escudos de los estados y territorios que forman la república mexicana. Año de MCMXXIII ("By agreement of the secretary of public education the coat of arms of the states and territories made up the Mexican republic decorate these walls. Year of MCMXXIII"). He placed the northern states in the southern wall, those of the south in the north and those of the central region in the west, in order to offer the entities the chance to face their realities with the desire for mutual recognition and appreciation, and integration of national unity.
From Paseos por murales de la Secretaría de Educación Pública, Secretaría de Educación Pública, Mexico 2018; p 208-209.
Reported by Juan Manuel Gabino Villascán, 4 January 2020.


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