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Unidentified Flags or Ensigns - Page 1 (2021)

flags submitted in 2021 - Page 1 of 3

Last modified: 2021-07-24 by pete loeser
Keywords: ufe | unidentified flags | 2021 |
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Please note our Policy for Submissions and Enquiries.

Below is a series of images of flags that have been provided to FOTW; some we have recognized, and some we have been unable to recognize. If you can help us identify any of these flags, please let us know! Contact the: UFE Editor.

Identification Key:

= Positive ID (Positive Identification)
= Tentative ID (Tentative Identification)
= Some Speculation

Unidentified Flags on this Page:

  1. Two Unknown Water Sports Pennants
  2. Unknown Rowing Club Flag
  3. White & Green Striped Flag with Misplaced Canton
  4. Unidentified Flag in a Painting
  5. Two unknown German Rowing Clubs (UFE/DE)
  6. Unidentified Flag from Civil Rights Era
  7. Unidentified Swedish Military Colour
  8. Unknown Yellow/Red Pennant with Wheel
  9. Possible German Federation Navy Ship Flag
  10. Unknown flag, Unknown Origin #1
  11. Unknown flag, Unknown Origin #1
  12. Unknown Israeli Military Flag
  13. Israeli Independence Day Flag
  14. Unknown Greek Ministry of Defence Flag

Unidentified Flags on Page 2

  1. Flag with Blue Mermaid
  2. Flag in Rural Kenya
  3. Inquiry on Wallon Flag
  4. Unknown Nigerian Flag
  5. Three Guatemalan Sporting Flags
  6. Flag in Confederate Cemetery
  7. Unusual flag seen in Canada
  8. Israeli 'Jerusalem Day' Flag 2021
  9. Possible ABDF Flag (Vietnam)
  10. Two Unknown Jerusalem Day Flags 2018
  11. Defaced Palestinian Flag
  12. Israeli 'Jerusalem Day' Flag 2016
  13. Israeli 'Jerusalem Day' Flag 2019
  14. Jewish Deportees Families? (French)
  15. Unknown Flag on Men's Jacket
  16. Unknown IDF Flag? (Israel)
  17. Unknown Flag above Dartington Hall (GB)
          

Unidentified Flags on Page 3

  1. Another Unidentified Israeli Flag
  2. Hezbollah Flag? (Lebanon)
  3. Coat of Arms to Identify c1820
  4. Odd Cuban flag
  5. Unknown Pink Flag (Ukraine)
  6. Kriegsmarine Signal Pennant?

Unidentified Flags on other pages


21-1. Two Unknown Water Sports Pennants Some Speculation

#1a   #1b
Images from Klaus-Michael Schneider, 12 January 2021

Found these on eBAY, I guess the sellers had no idea what they are.
1) Image #1a is related to Hamburg and denoted by the seller as rowing or sailing club. The "N" might be "Norderelbe", "Niederelbe" or something else.
2) Image #1b shows in the canton an anchor in bend and signal flags, probably "AGWR", not very likely "AGWX"".
Can anybody help?
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 12 January 2021


21-2. Unknown Rowing Club Flag Some Speculation

Image from Klaus-Michael Schneider, 13 January 2021

The flag is blue with a white (or yellow) pentagramma in hoist. The flag was hoisted together with those of many other (German) rowing clubs on the flag pole of WSV Rinteln on occasion of its 50-years anniversary. Maybe it belongs to a foreign rowing club? Can anybody assist?
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 13 January 2021

Shouldn't it say "red" somewhere? Did you ask them if it belongs to a foreign rowing club?
Peter Hans van den Muijzenberg, 18 May 2021


21-3. White & Green Striped Flag with Misplaced Canton Positive ID

Image from Jim Ferrigan, 19 January 2021

Any thoughts on this flag?
Jim Ferrigan, 19 January 2021

I'm not even sure which way is up... It looks to be a little hour-glass shaped? It did make me think a little of the NYC Police Flag and the speculative Tsakhur People's Flag.
Some similar color and design elements, but they aren't a very close match. Where did you find it if I might ask?
Pete Loeser, 21 January 2021

It was sent to me. It is cotton, 3'x5' and was made by Annin. My thoughts were similar, either NYCPD or a Brazillian state.
Jim Ferrigan, 22 January 2021

Like the FDNY flag which has two versions, the NYPD flag was once used in two variants. When I was 17 or so (way back in the 1960s) I went to NYC at the instigation of my mentor Whitney Smith and researched both the FDNY and NYPD flags. At the time they each had similar patterns, five stripes (R-W-R-W-R for the FDNY and V-W-V-W-V for the NYPD) with a canton (red for FDNY and blue for NYPD). The Fire Department flag bore the FDNY emblem and the Police Department flag bore 24 white five-pointed stars.
They each also had a "pall flag" for use on the coffins of those who died in the line of duty. In each case it was the same stripes with the canton moved to the center of the flag. In the case of the NYPD, the stars were reduced to five representing the five boroughs.
The FDNY still uses this pall flag but the NYPD no longer does. I have no idea when this custom was changed.
I have been unable to find any documentation on this online and my original notes likely went to the FRC, so you'll have to rely on my fading memory.
Dave Martucci, 16 May 2021

Although I suspect you are absolutely correct, I have one little nagging question. If the flag is only 3'x5' as reported, that makes it a drape for a very small coffin.
Pete Loeser, 16 May 2021

I saw the size but clearly recall the flag. Likely Annin had both in their catalog at some point and maybe offered them in different sizes. I note the stars on this example are oriented as a flag, not as a banner which I would think would be more likely. May have to look into this more at some point.
Dave Martucci, 16 May 2021


21-4. Unidentified Flag in a Painting. Some Speculation

Image from Bob Nawrocki, 19 January 2021

I am the librarian at the St. Augustine Historical Society Research Library and the Society recently received an unidentified painting of a ship with three flags on it. One is the US flag, and the other two are unknown. A volunteer suggested that the blue flag with stars might be a naval ensign. The third flag is blue with a white diamond and within the diamond is the letter H. A copy of the painting is attached. Any assistance you or your readers can provide is welcome.
Bob Nawrocki, Chief Librarian, St. Augustine Historical Society Research Library, 19 January 2021

Navy Jack    Oy Hacklin House Flag
Image by Clay Moss, 3 February 2007 - Image by Jorge Candeias, 18 March 1999

The one on the left appears to be a standard 48-star Naval Jack flown by US Navy ships between the years of 1912-1959. That could help date the ship, or the painting itself. However, I am not familiar with an American shipping company with a house flag like the one shown. It does, however, look like the flag of Oy Hacklin, Ltd. of Finland. But the combination of these three flags is a strange one to me. Hopefully one of our naval experts can unravel this one.
Pete Loeser, 28 January 2021


21-5. Two unknown German Rowing Clubs (UFE/DE) Positive ID

#5a    #5b
Images from Klaus-Michael Schneider, 23 January 2021

While working on the flags of the German Academic Rowing Union, two of the flags I couldn't identify. All clubs had been members of Akademischer Ruder Bund (Academic Rowing Union).
These could be:

  1. Akademische Ruderverbindung "Markomannia" zu Leipzig (1903-1971)
  2. Akademische Rudervereinigung "Borussia" zu Köln (1921-2020)
  3. Akademische Ruderschaft Bochum (1966)
  4. Akademische Ruderverbindung Karlsruhe (unknown)
  5. Akademische Ruderschaft Bochum (1966) we can exclude, as it was established in 1966 and primary source obviously is older.
I couldn't find anything about Akademische Ruderverbindung Karlsruhe. Thus Leipzig and Köln are my favorites. The others could be identified either by their coat of arms, called Panier, or we had it already in our German Rowing Clubs pages.
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 23 January 2021

Meanwhile I was able to identify both as:
   - 1. Akademische Ruderverbindung "Markomannia" zu Leipzig (1903-1971)- white, canton parted per bend sinister of green-white-red superimposed by the black Zirkel.
   - 2. Akademische Rudervereinigung "Borussia" zu Köln (1921-2020) - white, two red bends sinister in canton and black Zirkel in centre.
I'm still not sure about the Akademische Ruderverbindung Karlsruhe. If any of you can help me further please let me know.
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 1 February 2021


21-6. Unidentified Flag from Civil Rights Era Positive ID

Image from Calvin Kenney, 5 February 2021

I came across a flag I can't seem to identify, and I can't find it listed on your site. The flag in question (to the left behind Ralph Abernathy) seems to have been present at the 1965 Selma to Montgomery marches. It has a solid background, with some sort of unidentified symbol in a white circle in the center, possibly with writing around the edges. It appears in a few photos of the marches, but unfortunately, the one linked above seems to be the best image available. I can't find any record of a similar flag being associated with any of the groups involved in the march either. I was wondering if you might have any details about this flag, or any information that might help identify it.
Source: Photo by Bruce Davidson- Time of Change-1965 (image)
Calvin Kenney, 5 February 2021

Reverse Image from Pete Loeser, 19 April 2021

The flag in question is certainly the flag of the State of Kentucky. You are seeing the flag's reverse of a one-sided flag so in fact you are seeing the mirror image of the Kentucky seal. If you look closely the wreath is visible and likely the State name is too but I can't make it out exactly.
David B. Martucci, 7 February 2021

I guess we didn't give you a big enough challenge, so I'll add a new one for you. Now what is the other (blue?) flag behind the Kentucky flag? ...not the national flag, but the one to the right of it?
Pete Loeser, 19 April 2021

No problem at all; that is another Kentucky flag! I have attended demonstrations like this one (but not this one) and many people display their state flag and even sometimes their city flag (New York and Chicago especially). Sometimes different people with the same flag tend to drift together.
David B. Martucci, 19 April 2021


21-7. Unidentified Swedish Military Colour Positive ID

Image from Klaus-Michael Schneider, 6 February 2021

The flag is probably a Swedish colonel's colour (Leibfahne) due to its white colour. The inscription on top is unfortunately hard to read. The number in centre is probably related to Swedish King Carl XII, also being Duke of zweibrücken, and the flag thus probably from the Great Nordic War. The ensigns uniform and the type of head also seems to be Swedish. Can anybody assist
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 6 February 2021

It belongs to the former Royal Swedish Life Guard (Svea Livgarde) which was the Swedish monarch's personal guard (foot soldiers), with a history dating back to 1521. (Wikipedia: Life Guards (Sweden).
The flag in question is the model from 1686 (m/ 1686), which looks like it is from a flag-bearing tin soldier, and has been altered by adding the Roman numeral number of Charles XII (1682-1718; regent 1697-1718), though it should not really be there (as his monogram was a C/mirrored C). The text should read DILECTUMQUE DEO NULLA RUINA PREMIT, Latin for "The one chosen by god fears no defeat." The white colour is explained by the fact that this is a grenadier regiment.
The full story of the flag and the unit can be found (in English) here on Kunglig Majestäts Livgarde till fot - del 1 (tacitus.nu) and here on Kunglig Majestäts Livgarde till fot - del 2, both on the tacitus.nu website.
Daniel Lundberg, 26 June 2021


21-8. Unknown Yellow/Red Pennant with Wheel

Image from Klaus-Michael Schneider, 6 February 2021

The pennant is parted of yellow and red with a black steering wheel shifted to hoist, I guess either a shipping company or a yacht club pennant. Can anybody assist?
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 6 February 2021


21-9. Possible German Federation Navy Ship Flag Some Speculation

Image from Klaus-Michael Schneider, 6 February 2021

The pennant is white with a bordure of German Colours black-red-golden, charged with a badge at hoist, displaying a white no.3 on a blue wave, above a silhouette of a black ship's prow with a gun, a fly an embowed shark. I guess, it is a ship flag.
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 6 February 2021

This shows at hoist site the badge of the former German Navy Destroyer Z3. The badge can be found on several sites including offers of the badge on eBay and here on Amazon. I did not found an explanation for the whole flag - might be of a special operation or maneuver.... with some sort of fish-name.
Andreas Bühne, 13 March 2021

Image located by Pete Loeser, 13 March 2021

Based on Andreas's information, I found this coat of arms/plaque of the Bundesmarine Max Schultz Destroyer Z3 on eBay (source). However a second source, see German Navy Coat of Arms for the Z3, led me further down a rabbit hole.
I found that the original Max Schultz that Andreas had located sunk in mid-February of 1940 while proceeding into the North Sea to search for British fishing trawlers. One of her sisters, the Z1 Leberecht Maass, was bombed and sunk by a patrolling bomber. While trying to rescue survivors, the original Max Schultz struck a British mine and sank with all hands. (source). The pennant didn't look that old.
I then discovered in 1959 an American Fletcher-class destroyer named the USS Wadsworth (DD-516) was turned over to West Germany and went into the Federal Republic of Germany's Service as, you guessed it, a new Z3. For the next 20 years or so it served in the German navy before it changed hands again in October of 1980. It was renamed the Nearchos where it served until 1991 in the Hellenic Navy, then decommissioned and sold for scrap.
So this doesn't completely identify this pennant, but based on its good condition it seems to me that perhaps this was from the time period of 1959-1980, and the second German Z3. I leave it up to you naval experts to unravel the whole tale.
Pete Loeser 13 March 2021.


21-10. Unknown flag, Unknown Origin #1

Image from Andreas Bühne, 10 March 2021

My website presents the collection of flags related to marine business that I inherited from my father. Although he had a bibliothek of more than 1000 books there are some flags he could not identify.
I don't know anything about the origin of the attached flag. Neither the country, nor the company. According to "flagpole.de" and Josef Nüsse this flag might be of Ems Middle East Line, Rotterdam. My father doubted this, but could not find other references.
Andreas Bühne, 10 March 2021


21-11. Unknown flag, Unknown Origin #2 Tentative ID

Image from Andreas Bühne, 10 March 2021

I don't know anything about the origin of this second attached flag. Neither the country, nor the company. I have researched on the internet without results.
Andreas Bühne, 10 March 2021

Is it possible that you mention the specific source for this flag? That is: the book and/or publication, its author, date, and every other detail that might be useful in tracing this item, such as place of origin, etc.
Esteban Rivera, 10 March 2021

Unfortunately I don't know anything about the flag. When my father died I inherited a collection of more than 3,200 flags of shipping companies, shipyards and many other branches related to ships in some way.
My father already spent a lot of time with his books and he tried to find answers on the internet, but he did not note where he received the flags from. So I have nothing more than the table-flag, sized 25 x 15 cm.
Andreas Bühne, 10 March 2021

I believe it might be the flag of the Catskill Evening Line, an American company.
Dominique Cureau, 10 March 2021

Although the CEL lettering is correct (minus the periods) and the colors (while the same) are reversed between this flag and our existing CEL drawing, so I'd have to make this identification only a Tentative ID for the time being. I think we will have to dig a little deeper.
Pete Loeser, 13 March 2021


21-12. Unknown Israeli Military Flag Positive ID

flag indicated by red arrow.

This flag has been positively identified and is now located here.


21-13. Israel Independence Day Flag?

Image located by Bill Garrison, 12 April 2021

I have no idea what the wording reads on this Israeli flag. I do not know whether or not it is hand painted, or silk-screened. Perhaps one of your Israeli researchers can identify its relevance. (source)
The caption on the picture reads "Israelis celebrate Independence Day on the beach, 2019" (photo credit: Avshalom Sassoni)
William Garrison, 12 April 2021


21-14. Unknown Greek Ministry of Defence Flag Positive ID

Image from William Garrison, 18 April 2021

Regarding the flag in dark blue in the middle and on the desktop, I did not see it on FOTW. I looked at the Minister of Defense page and it was similar to the "Car flag of the Minister of Defense," but my photo shows a solid blue background. Maybe one of your Greece researches can ID it.
The caption reads: "Israel, Greece sign their largest defense procurement agreement, April 18 2021 (photo credit: GREEK DEFENSE MINISTRY)" (source).
William Garrison, 18 April 2021

Larger and less obscured image on Twitter here.
Rob Raeside, 18 April 2021

Image from Pete Loeser, 24 April 2021

A quick visit to Wiki gives us this: "The Ministry of National Defence, is the civilian cabinet organisation responsible for managing the Hellenic Armed Forces, the leader of which is, according to the Constitution, the President of the Republic but their administration is exercised only by the Prime Minister and the Government of Greece. It is located at 227-231 Messogion Avenue, in the Papagos camp in Athens, between Papagos and Holargos," and a quick paste of the emblem onto a blue beadsheet gives us this. (source)
Pete Loeser, 24 April 2021

The shield features the symbols of the Army (helmet), the Air Force (wings) and the Navy (anchor). The motto, written in archaic script, reads ἀμύνεσθαι περὶ πάτρης, "To fight for one's country".
It comes from Homer's Iliad, book 12, line 243, εἷς οἰωνὸς ἄριστος ἀμύνεσθαι περὶ πάτρης, "One omen is best, to fight for one's country".
This is the answer given by Hector to his friend Polydamas, who suggests the Trojans to stop the attack of the Greek rampart in the face of the omen of an eagle. Polydamas' warning was wise, since the assault turned to a disaster. Hector's answer and decision, was, however, considered by further scholars as a model of patriotic courage, therefore its use as the motto of the Greek Ministry of Defence.
Ivan Sache, 26 April 2021


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